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debt relief Archives

Study finds more medical debt among younger people

Younger Louisiana residents may be more likely to fall into medical debt than their older counterparts. A study that appeared in the journal Health Affairs found that from the age 27 to 64, the size of medical debt went down almost 40 percent. This could be because older people have had more time to build up resources, and many are eligible for Medicaid. Younger people may also have more limited insurance with large deductibles.

How money mistakes really impact credit reports

Louisiana residents may think that their credit scores are only negatively impacted by late payments, exceeding credit limits or other related mistakes. However, even seemingly innocent actions like applying for a new credit card or loan can put a negative mark on a credit report.

Strategies to delay or prevent home foreclosure

When financial hardships strike Louisiana residents, house payments often suffer. Missing mortgage payments will prompt a lender to initiate the foreclosure process after 90 days of delinquency. People in this situation might resolve the problem by working with their lenders or pursuing bankruptcy protection.

Stopping harassment by debt collectors

Debtors in Louisiana who suffer from harassment by debt collectors have legal recourse. While these companies are within their legal rights to contact consumers about delinquent accounts, any harassment that they conduct is illegal. Those that engage in harassment can be reported to the Federal Trade Commission and can be subject to punitive action.

Do I have enough debt to file for bankruptcy?

The bills are piling up. Maybe it happened gradually--a missed credit card payment here, a missed car payment there--or maybe it was sudden: severe illness, loss of employment or another catastrophic change. Either way, it's more than you can handle. You've heard that declaring bankruptcy can wipe out debts and give you a fresh start, but you aren't sure if that's an option. Do you really owe enough to consider that?

The reason credit card rates are increasing

For Louisiana residents and others with credit card debt, an increase in the federal funds rate can lead to higher bills. This is because the fed funds rate and credit card interest rates are linked together. In March 2018, the Federal Reserve increased this rate to 1.75 percent. While other debts can be impacted by changes to this rate, credit card balances are the most likely to be subject to variable rates.

Bankruptcy might discharge some tax debts under narrow conditions

Bankruptcy might offer relief to people overwhelmed by multiple debts in Louisiana, but tax debts often do not qualify for discharge. Bankruptcy laws, however, contain numerous exceptions to general rules, and certain circumstances could make the discharge of a tax debt possible.

Charity care from hospitals could help people avoid medical debt

People in Louisiana confronted by high medical bills should investigate whether their hospitals offer assistance to people unable to pay. Some hospitals that accept government funding have an obligation to set up charity care funds. They usually do not promote the programs, but hospitals have billions of dollars available nationwide to help people challenged by high medical costs. According to the American Hospital Association, U.S. hospitals offered $38 billion in financial assistance to patients in 2016.

Interest rate increase could mean more debt for some

According to at least one nonprofit credit counseling service, the number of people seeking help with debt has increased. Some Louisiana consumers could be among those who have mounting debt. Unfortunately, Americans have a pattern of feeling good when the economy is strong and loading up on debt that they then struggle to pay off during leaner times.

Rate hikes may make debts harder to pay

In 2017, people throughout the country added $92 billion in credit card debt. That is twice the annual average since the end of the Great Recession. For Louisiana cardholders, recent rate hike increases may have be harder to take even if the raises are only .25 point each. According to WalletHub, there have been four years in the past 30 that saw credit card debt increase by that much.